Thank you!

Today, I decided randomly to check my blog stats.

Image

Ever since I posted this article, the views and comments on my blog have been booming. It is truly, truly humbling and I thank you from the bottom of my heart.

When I read “6 reasons to NOT send your daughter to college,” I was angry. I was sad. I felt hurt. It felt like a personal attack on my sister, my mother, my friends, my cousins, and me. Independent women, many of whom are living devout Catholic lives, who went to school simply for a love of learning. That’s why I’m in school. Because I want to know more. I want to learn about the world I live in, about the people who surround me, about my faith and my Church. I’m not here for a career. I’m majoring in English and Theology, neither of those are in the least bit practical.

I believe I am a feminist. I’m against birth control, and abortion, and a lot of other things secular feminists say are “women’s rights,” but I believe that God made men and women equal. Not the same, but equal in their dignity. Everyone deserves an education, regardless of their gender roles.

Again, thank you, and God bless you.

6 Reasons to NOT Send Your Son to College

A rebuttal to this post and inspired by this post

  1. He will attract the wrong type of women.  Ah, college. The home of parties and frat boys. There are so many lazy men in our society, that it’s likely if you send your son to college, he will become a partying frat boy, lazy. Thus, he will attract the wrong type of women. Tsk tsk. He should just stay home and meet a nice girl at his job (Walmart and/or McDonald’s) or church, and they can get married and make lots of babies and he will provide with his income. 
  2. He will be in a near occasion of sin.  Boys will be boys… right? He’ll be tempted to, instead of going to mass on Sunday, stay in his dorm with friends, maybe being corrupted by some sorority girls, maybe underage drinking, Just think of the environment that college-age students live in.  You have a heavy concentration of young people all living together without the supervision of parents at the most sexually charged state of life they will experience.  How can one expect that anyone would be able to avoid these temptations, even on a Catholic college campus much less a secular one?  So if it is unnecessary for one to be in a near occasion of sin, is it prudent to willingly put oneself there?  This is no small matter we’re dealing with here.  Is a degree worth the loss of your son’s purity, dignity, and soul?  I don’t think so
  3. He will not learn to be a father or husband .  Nothing that is taught in a college curriculum is geared toward how to be a good father, husband, or even how to correctly treat a woman. He doesn’t learn about what he was c r e a t e d to do, so why even bother? He will instead learn things like, “work before wife and children” and “money is power”. You don’t want your son to be like that, do you?
  4. The cost of a degree is becoming more difficult to recoup.  Like anything that is subsidized by the government, the cost of a college degree is inflated.  That being the case, it can often be difficult or impossible to get an adequate payoff for the investment.  The most common example of that scenario is the job of a school teacher.  More commonly now we’re seeing situations where not only is the income not enough to support a family, but many are strapped with student loan debt.  Add to that the possibility of not even being able to get a job with the degree and you have economic disaster for a family before they even get started. 
  5. You don’t have to prove anything to the world.  Often the reason for a man going to college is the pressure of the society around him, including his parents.  The man who graduates from high school along with his parents gets the endless barrage of questions of “Where are you going to college?”  The society is so fixated with the idea that a paycheck makes a man, so parents and sons often beam with pride in what university he will attend. So parents and their daughters often beam with pride in announcing what university she will attend.  Astonishingly even homeschool parents fall into this folly.  Often homeschooling parents feel they have to prove that they have done a good job in educating their children and are validated by them going to college.  But the confounding thing is that they went through all this effort to raise and educate their sons themselves but don’t give their sons the opportunity to do the same by locking him into a career. What if he wants to help homeschool his children, but instead feels trapped by the career that is pushed upon him
  6. It could be a near occasion of sin for the parents.  In our culture many parents feel an unnecessary obligation to pay for the children’s college tuition.  Of course to aid in that there are a host of financial advisers who can set up college investment savings programs for which the government will grant tax favors.  So parents may avoid having more children with contraception, sterilization, or illicit use of NFP to bear this cost.  To assume that all of our children will need a college degree is quite a stretch, particularly for men who will likely be fathers and can make just enough to get by at Walmart.
  7. He will regret it.  When he has children, and misses baseball games, first communions, dance recitals, and other special things because he is at his job, he will wish he didn’t go to college so he didn’t have to work this job. When his wife tells him that he should take time to be a father. When his kids have no desire to talk to him anymore. When he walks his daughter down the aisle and wonders where the time went, and realizes that he could have spent so much more time with her if he had just not went to college
  8. It could interfere with a religious vocation.  According to Corey Huber, President of the Mater Ecclesiae Fund for Vocations, Catholic seminaries and religious orders do not accept candidates who have substantial unpaid debt. He states the average college loan debt today is a staggering $27,029 which takes most graduates a decade or more to pay off.  

 

Oh, and if you were wondering, for many of the reasons, I simply changed “girl” to “guy” and “she” to “he”. I also fixed some horrific grammar issues.